Humberstone Infant Academy

Safeguarding

This page contains important Safeguarding information for parents.

UPSKIRTING

What is it?
Upskirting is part of peer-on-peer abuse (Peer-on-peer abuse is abuse that happens between children of a similar age or stage of development) and involves taking a picture under a person’s clothing without them knowing to obtain sexual gratification or cause the victim humiliation, distress or alarm. Children can experience peer-on-peer sexual abuse in a wide range of settings, including:

• at school
• at home or in someone else’s home
• in public spaces

Upskirting became a criminal offence in 2019.

How does School raise awareness of and prevent peer-on-peer abuse?
Children are taught through the PSRE and the wider curriculum about the nature and prevalence of peer-on-peer abuse. This helps children to understand and know who they can talk to if they are concerned about anything or have experienced something upsetting. This includes what to do if they witness or experience such abuse.
Staff know that all forms of peer-on-peer abuse are unacceptable, will be taken seriously and will not be tolerated. Staff should not develop high thresholds before taking action and should be aware of the importance of:

• making it clear that abuse is not acceptable, will never be tolerated and is not an inevitable part of growing up.
• not tolerating or dismissing abuse as ‘banter’, ‘part of growing up’ or ‘just having a laugh’.

What should I do if it happens to my child?
If your child tells you this has happened to them or says something that worries you in any way, get some advice.
Talk to a teacher at school, call the NSPCC helpline on 0808 800 5000, or contact the police.

CHILD SEXUAL EXPLOITATION

What is Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)?
Child sexual exploitation (CSE) is a form of child sexual abuse where an individual or a group of people takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child into sexual activity:

• In exchange for something the victim needs or wants
• For the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator.

Child sexual exploitation can begin without the victim’s knowledge. This is known as grooming. For example, a young person may be persuaded to post or send sexual photographs on the internet or via mobile phones without receiving any benefit themselves.
In all cases of child sexual exploitation, those doing the exploiting have power or influence over their victim. This can be due to a difference in age, gender, intelligence, wealth or physical strength. This abuse can be perpetrated by individuals or groups, males or females, and children or adults. The abuse can be a one-off occurrence or a series of incidents over time, and range from opportunistic to complex organised abuse. Child sexual exploitation can also occur online, and does not always include physical contact.
Grooming
Child sexual exploitation can occur in different ways and in different situations. Many young people are ‘groomed’ by their abuser, online or face-to-face. Grooming is a carefully planned process with the aim of controlling a young person, to ensure that they do exactly what the perpetrator wants. Groomers will hide their true intentions and may spend a long time gaining a child’s trust. Groomers may try to gain the trust of a whole family to allow them to be left alone with a child and if they work with children they may use similar tactics with their colleagues. Initially, a young person may receive gifts and be showered with attention and affection, but this may later turn to blackmail, threats of violence or actual violence. Groomers do this by:

• pretending to be someone they are not, for example saying they are the same age online
• offering advice or understanding
• buying gifts
• giving the child attention
• using their professional position or reputation
• taking them on trips, outings or holidays.

What should I look for if I am concerned about my child?
Indicators of sexual exploitation can include children who:

• Appear with unexplained gifts or new possessions
• Associate with other young people involved in exploitation
• Have older boyfriends or girlfriends
• Suffer from sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant
• Display inappropriate sexualised behaviour
• Suffer from changes in emotional wellbeing
• Misuse drugs and/or alcohol
• Go missing for periods of time or regularly come home late
• Regularly miss school or education, or do not take part in education
• Increased use of mobile phone and/or internet
• Involvement in criminal activity

What should I do if I am concerned about my child?
If you are concerned about your child or they say something that worries you in any way, get some advice. Talk to a teacher at school, call the NSPCC helpline on 0808 800 5000, or contact the police.

CHILD CRIMINAL EXPLOITATION

What is Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE)?
Child Criminal Exploitation occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, control, manipulate or deceive a child in to any criminal activity:

• in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or

• for the financial or other advantage of the perpetrator or facilitator and/or
• through violence or the threat of violence.

The victim may have been criminally exploited even if the activity appears consensual. Child Criminal Exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can occur through the use of technology.
The children are victims in need of safeguarding and support and although perceptions are altering, these young people are still often criminalised and perceived as having ‘made a choice’ to take part in illegal activity when in most cases, they have been groomed and coerced. Crimes associated with CCE include;

• Violence/Serious Violence – Gangs sometimes use violence to threaten children and young people when recruiting them. Gangs also violently assault children and young people working for them if they find their drugs or money to be missing. Weapons such as firearms, knives, bats, acid are sometimes used to make violent threats.

• Exploitation – Gangs recruit and use children and young people to move drugs and money for them. Children as young as 11 years old are recruited, often using social media. They are exploited and forced to carry drugs between locations, usually on trains or coaches. They are also forced to sell drugs to local users.

• Sexual Exploitation – Young girls are often groomed and forced into relationships with gang members and are made to perform sexual acts. Both young boys and girls exploited and trafficked across towns and cities

What should I look for if I am concerned about my child?
A child is unlikely to directly disclose their situation for fear of repercussions. However, there are a number of signs that may indicate a pupil is a victim. They may include:

• Miss school
• Have low self-esteem, and feelings of isolation, stress or fear
• Lack trust in adults and appear fearful of authorities
• Have poor concentration
• Become anti-social
• Display symptoms of substance dependence

What should I do if it happens to my child?
If your child tells you this has happened to them or says something that worries you in any way, get some advice. Talk to a teacher at school, or call the NSPCC helpline on 0808 800 5000, or contact the police.

 

Useful Links

  • Action for Children Action for Children supports and speaks for the UK’s most vulnerable and neglected children and young people.

  • CEOP News and articles surrounding internet safety.

  • NSPCC Online Safety Helpful advice and tools you can use to help keep your child safe whenever and wherever they go online.

  • Parent Info Expert information to help children and young people stay safe online.

  • Think You Know Great advice to keep children safe whilst using the internet.